Wood Slick

This is by far my earliest and largest photographic project.  Most times, its better to show one or two pictures.  I am taking a chance and showing 20 pictures.  The photographs really tell the story and I hope they hold your interest.  I managed to capture these pictures early one morning going along the coast road to work.

The Cargo Ship,  “The Ice Prince” carrying Timber, ran into trouble in rough sea’s near Portland Bill, England in January 2008.  The crew where all rescued by helicopter and lifeboat, before she sank.   Timber, 33ft long planks where washed off the Ship causing a Wood Slick running from West (Portland Bill) to East (Beachy Head and beyond) of the English Channel.  “This is what I saw that morning”.

These shots taken, were on a beach stretch in Worthing a few odd miles West of Brighton & Hove, England.  2000 tonnes, washed up along the coast causing hazards on the beaches and to the shipping lanes.  Anybody lifting timber away were threatened with arrest…

Two Dog’s

I didn’t go looking for this building, Iv’e past it more times than I can remember and not really taken any notice of it.  How could I go past and not snap it up!  It was an old stable sighted high up on a hill in Brighton.  Could be Regency but probably Victorian. Beuatiful cast moulded dog heads in moulded frame fixed to the stable doors.

The Stable doors, I think its only storage now.

End of stable building.  In contrast to this building, a new trendy development has been constructed opposite this image.

These are great mouldings fitted to the stable doors, let the mouldings do the talking.  Lovely local history…

More Hove Cemetery

Had another stroll through Hove cemetery with the “Jack” this afternoon.  Found some more interesting monuments, take a look.

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

Found this Tomb:  The inscriptions are hard to read (zoom in, maybe you can see better) He was a French Noble!  As far as I can make out, his stone reads; “Charles Augustus Vicomte Pinon Du Clos De Valmer”, The Last of His Race.  The inscription goes on and on and makes interesting reading…

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

Charles Augustus Vicomte Pinon Du Clos De Valmer, Family Crest…

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

A family Monument, a family history.  On this monument, I found a sad read about a lad who died in the African Campaign and is remembered on this stone.  My Great Grand Father served in the same campaign in a different regiment! and was featured in  BBC documentaries in the 60’s, one of the last surviving solders of that campaign. “Boer War”.

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

A brave young man…

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

Hove Cemetery.  Opened 1882 by Henry Hawkes.

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

Just thought, the last picture should be colour, as it was a glorious afternoon…

Pier & Hut’s

It’s a dreary sort of day in Hove, so time to add a few more pic’s.

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

Side swipe of Brighton Pier.  I prefered it when it was the Palace Pier.

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

Hove esplanade heading east towards Brighton.  Beach huts with City Council offices in back ground on Grand Avenue.

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

The Huts after the Storm.

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

Early morning stroll with the dog…

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

Hove’s Hut’s…

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

Early start preparing for the Sunny day ahead…

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

End of the esplanade, this is where the Beach Huts finish… Hope you enjoyed my eye’s view.

The Cemetary

I took a little stroll with the “Jack” this afternoon, to Hove cemetery North side, to pay my respects to a very dear friend.  I went loaded with the camera for a reason “Not a morbid one”.  Brighton and Hove cemetery’s carry bag’s of history and my interest lay’s with a certain man.  I read a little bit about this man and where he was buried, that’s all I had to go on.  As you are all aware burial grounds are huge, so it took me many attempts to find the plot.

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

The flint Chapel on the South side heading east, Hove cemetery.

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

A couple of visitors enjoying the view’s of Hove from the Chapel.  The tower takes on a face like appearance, what do you think!

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

One of the Classical monuments in the cemetery.

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

This was the Grave that I was looking for.  Martin Leonard Landfried.

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

What was you doing at 15 yrs of age!  I don’t know where he was born ,but he was buried in Hove.  When Martin Leonard Landfried was just a lad, he sounded The Charge!  The Charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava.  You couldn’t imaging what was going on in his head or what he saw that day…

Picture Courtesy: UrbanPlumber

This lad made it through the battle at Balaclava and survived to serve, in the Indian Mutiny and retired as a Trumpet Major.  Tennyson wrote, “into the valley of Death rode the six hundred“.  A lovely piece of history on my doorstep.  “God bless him”.

I shall add more to this blogg sometime.

More West Pier!

UrbanPlumber  Picture Courtesy:  UrbanPlumber

End of another day West Pier Hove.  Part of the Pier collapsed bottom left, now cleared for safety reasons.

UrbanPlumber  Picture Courtesy:  UrbanPlumber

A Boxing day sunset over the West Pier Hove.

UrbanPlumber  Picture Courtesy:  UrbanPlumber

Another “Med” like day in sunny Brighton.  My beach when I was a teenager, good memories early 70’s

On the Brighton theme

Regency Square  Picture Courtesy:  UrbanPlumber

I’ve posted a couple of aerial shots of Regency Square Brighton, from a balcony on the 11th Floor Sussex Heights, looking West over to Hove.  Regency Square was constructed in 1818 – 1828 on what was called the Belle Vue Field.  Individual plots were bought from the developer Joshua Hanson.  Covenants were drawn for this development which required owners to repaint the facades every three years and contribute towards the up keep of the enclosure .  The Covenants ran for 71 years from 1818 and subsequently taken over after by the Corporation as part of the 1884 Brighton Improvement Act.  ( Zoom in and look around the buildings )

Regency Square 2  Picture Courtesy:  UrbanPlumber

View of, the back of the East Side, of Regency Square.  The facades and frontages of these Grade ll listed buildings are fairly well manicured, the rear of these buildings, not so as you can see.  Added extensions and new builds cling to the rear running up to road behind.  The 1.56 acre gardens in the Square hide the underground car park that was built at a cost of £523.000 and was opened in the Easter of 1969.

Glasgow Coat-of-Arms.

  Picture Courtesy:  UrbanPlumber

What a little gem this Glasgow crest is.  My interest not just being the amazing Fountain, my point of interest ,being the Crest embedded into the earthenwere brickwork on “The Doulton Fountain” at the People’s Palace, Glasgow Green.  The Fountain was devised by A. E. Pearce of Messrs Doulton for the 1888 International Exhibition in Kelvingrove.  After it was presented to the City by Sir Henry Doulton, it was re-erected where it stands today.

   Picture Courtesy:  UrbanPlumber

This Crest magnificently built into facade above the entrance to The People’s Palace.  The design embedded in to the Crest say’s,

Here’s the Bird, that never flew,

Here’s the Tree, that never grew,

Here’s the Bell, that never rang,

Here’s the Fish, that never swam.       It is said that there is a another line.    That’s jist the drunken Salmon!

Should you get the chance, pay this part of the East of Glasgow a visit, well worth it.

  Picture Courtesy :  UrbanPlumber

Walking through the back of the “Barra’s” heading towards Glasgow Green, I stumbled across this modern addition of the Crest.

Hove’s West Pier

A mere shadow of its once splended self, all that remains is the charred carcass of what was a beautiful Pier.  I grew up in Hove, the beach/Seafront played a huge part in my growing up years, it is still a big part of what I do now.

As a young boy this beach “The West Pier beach” was one of my favorites.  When I used to use this beach in the early 70’s the Pier was a fully working concern, with different shows and amusements, the Pier decks were heaving with visitors and locals alike.

We as a gang of lads would cycle down and along the Hove Lawns and esplanade to grab a good position on the beach for the long hot day ahead.  The bikes were piled up, the towels were down, the sun was getting hotter and sea beckoned.  It was always best when the tide was out or going out, because we could swim or wade out to the end of the Pier with our feet just being able to touch the sand bed below.  On the turn of the tide, we would catch the waves and body surf back to shore again and again.  Long hot lovely days…

New Years Day a few years back now, I was up early 5.30am, the local radio station news declared that, the West Pier had been Arson attacked and was burning beyond control.  After a quick cup of coffee, “Mac the Jack” was leashed up and we walked the mile or so to the Pier from home in the wind and rain, passing homeward bound party goer’s still drinking and hugging each other exchanging “Happy New Years” with me.  As we approached, It was a sad sight indeed, the Pier’s long cast iron legs held he burning old lady out of the water, so she just slowly burned until all that remained was the metal skeleton that is now a huge tourist attraction

A small party of early risers were watching the Pier burn as I wondered on to the beach with the dog, tears were shed and some were gathering timber embers that had dropped into the sea and washed up the beach from the flaming wreck.  Most people were still in bed or recovering from the night before parties, blissfully unaware that the poor old girl ” The West Pier ” was dying.  What you see in my picture is all that remains now, the rest of the Pier that linked the shore to the remaining  carcass was severally storm damaged and had to be demolished for safety reasons.

I managed to take this shot of the Pier from the eleventh floor at ” Sussex Heights ” overlooking the beach and Pier, whilst working in an apartment.